Concrete, cubic Cientocinco House create by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta with a stunning blend of modernist looking and natural materials

[ad_1]

Near the San Martin Nature Reserve and a series of ravines in Cordoba, Argentina, the Cientocinco House was recently finished by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta. This house, built primarily from concrete, is cubic in shape and combines it’s hard materiality with sleek, natural wood for a modernist but relaxing aesthetic.

The house is located in the northwest part of the city, which is partially responsible for its stunning views of the reserve and the nearby ravines. These natural features of the landscape appear to add breadth and charm to the surrounding area extending beyond the house, giving it an increased sense of character before other, manmade elements are even considered.

While designers were planning the home, there were several elements of the plot’s natural land that they were determined not to alter or interfere with if possible. They wished to build a house that had a foundation that worked with the land, rather than cutting into and disturbing the ground on which the house sits.

Building a foundation of cast concrete let it mould to the land in a way that could be built upon sturdily without vastly changing the overall landscape surrounding the house. Designers opted to continue these concrete themed further until it become the majority of the structure. Its natural beauty once it was polished was so immense that they kept it as a main element and embellished it with softer accents to create the bulk of their modernist aesthetic.

This is how smoothed wood became the secondary element of the impressively stacked looking, cubic inspired house. Doors, window castings, ceilings, and furnishings all bear a wooden nature that adds a sense of warmth to the concrete and steel found elsewhere in the home’s interior and exterior.

Inside the house, the home continues the same straight edged, cubic inspired shaping as can be seen in its actual shape from the street. Furniture is boxy and pleasantly symmetrical. Stairs are solid and made of concrete blocks. Windows are neat and even (though big enough to let in wondrous amounts of natural light, which also assists in warming the concrete spaces).

Even the relaxation and leisure elements of the house follow that same cubic shaping. The patio where outdoor lounge chairs sit has a curtain frame that forms a steel cube around it. The patio itself even possesses a grid texture with greenery sprouting from each squared off space. Even the pool itself has a right-angle in its angular L-shape!

The grass growing from the grid-like patio isn’t the only greenery involved in the house. Decor teams made sure to incorporate plants throughout, which brightens the place even further than the high windows already did and adds a sense of nature and cohesiveness with the environment surrounding the plot. Towards the back of the house, on the opposite side of the pool and patio, sits a row of lush trees, providing a fresh, relaxing atmosphere and shade from the summer sun.

Overall, between its sturdy frame and inclusion of greenery, this cubic house has a sense of privacy and tranquility despite its close proximity to a busy city street.

Photos by Gonzalo Viramonte

Concrete, cubic Cientocinco House create by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta with a stunning blend of modernist looking and natural materials

[ad_1]

Near the San Martin Nature Reserve and a series of ravines in Cordoba, Argentina, the Cientocinco House was recently finished by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta. This house, built primarily from concrete, is cubic in shape and combines it’s hard materiality with sleek, natural wood for a modernist but relaxing aesthetic.

The house is located in the northwest part of the city, which is partially responsible for its stunning views of the reserve and the nearby ravines. These natural features of the landscape appear to add breadth and charm to the surrounding area extending beyond the house, giving it an increased sense of character before other, manmade elements are even considered.

While designers were planning the home, there were several elements of the plot’s natural land that they were determined not to alter or interfere with if possible. They wished to build a house that had a foundation that worked with the land, rather than cutting into and disturbing the ground on which the house sits.

Building a foundation of cast concrete let it mould to the land in a way that could be built upon sturdily without vastly changing the overall landscape surrounding the house. Designers opted to continue these concrete themed further until it become the majority of the structure. Its natural beauty once it was polished was so immense that they kept it as a main element and embellished it with softer accents to create the bulk of their modernist aesthetic.

This is how smoothed wood became the secondary element of the impressively stacked looking, cubic inspired house. Doors, window castings, ceilings, and furnishings all bear a wooden nature that adds a sense of warmth to the concrete and steel found elsewhere in the home’s interior and exterior.

Inside the house, the home continues the same straight edged, cubic inspired shaping as can be seen in its actual shape from the street. Furniture is boxy and pleasantly symmetrical. Stairs are solid and made of concrete blocks. Windows are neat and even (though big enough to let in wondrous amounts of natural light, which also assists in warming the concrete spaces).

Even the relaxation and leisure elements of the house follow that same cubic shaping. The patio where outdoor lounge chairs sit has a curtain frame that forms a steel cube around it. The patio itself even possesses a grid texture with greenery sprouting from each squared off space. Even the pool itself has a right-angle in its angular L-shape!

The grass growing from the grid-like patio isn’t the only greenery involved in the house. Decor teams made sure to incorporate plants throughout, which brightens the place even further than the high windows already did and adds a sense of nature and cohesiveness with the environment surrounding the plot. Towards the back of the house, on the opposite side of the pool and patio, sits a row of lush trees, providing a fresh, relaxing atmosphere and shade from the summer sun.

Overall, between its sturdy frame and inclusion of greenery, this cubic house has a sense of privacy and tranquility despite its close proximity to a busy city street.

Photos by Gonzalo Viramonte

Concrete, cubic Cientocinco House create by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta with a stunning blend of modernist looking and natural materials

[ad_1]

Near the San Martin Nature Reserve and a series of ravines in Cordoba, Argentina, the Cientocinco House was recently finished by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta. This house, built primarily from concrete, is cubic in shape and combines it’s hard materiality with sleek, natural wood for a modernist but relaxing aesthetic.

The house is located in the northwest part of the city, which is partially responsible for its stunning views of the reserve and the nearby ravines. These natural features of the landscape appear to add breadth and charm to the surrounding area extending beyond the house, giving it an increased sense of character before other, manmade elements are even considered.

While designers were planning the home, there were several elements of the plot’s natural land that they were determined not to alter or interfere with if possible. They wished to build a house that had a foundation that worked with the land, rather than cutting into and disturbing the ground on which the house sits.

Building a foundation of cast concrete let it mould to the land in a way that could be built upon sturdily without vastly changing the overall landscape surrounding the house. Designers opted to continue these concrete themed further until it become the majority of the structure. Its natural beauty once it was polished was so immense that they kept it as a main element and embellished it with softer accents to create the bulk of their modernist aesthetic.

This is how smoothed wood became the secondary element of the impressively stacked looking, cubic inspired house. Doors, window castings, ceilings, and furnishings all bear a wooden nature that adds a sense of warmth to the concrete and steel found elsewhere in the home’s interior and exterior.

Inside the house, the home continues the same straight edged, cubic inspired shaping as can be seen in its actual shape from the street. Furniture is boxy and pleasantly symmetrical. Stairs are solid and made of concrete blocks. Windows are neat and even (though big enough to let in wondrous amounts of natural light, which also assists in warming the concrete spaces).

Even the relaxation and leisure elements of the house follow that same cubic shaping. The patio where outdoor lounge chairs sit has a curtain frame that forms a steel cube around it. The patio itself even possesses a grid texture with greenery sprouting from each squared off space. Even the pool itself has a right-angle in its angular L-shape!

The grass growing from the grid-like patio isn’t the only greenery involved in the house. Decor teams made sure to incorporate plants throughout, which brightens the place even further than the high windows already did and adds a sense of nature and cohesiveness with the environment surrounding the plot. Towards the back of the house, on the opposite side of the pool and patio, sits a row of lush trees, providing a fresh, relaxing atmosphere and shade from the summer sun.

Overall, between its sturdy frame and inclusion of greenery, this cubic house has a sense of privacy and tranquility despite its close proximity to a busy city street.

Photos by Gonzalo Viramonte

Concrete, cubic Cientocinco House create by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta with a stunning blend of modernist looking and natural materials

[ad_1]

Near the San Martin Nature Reserve and a series of ravines in Cordoba, Argentina, the Cientocinco House was recently finished by JAMStudio arquitectos + Ivanna Cresta. This house, built primarily from concrete, is cubic in shape and combines it’s hard materiality with sleek, natural wood for a modernist but relaxing aesthetic.

The house is located in the northwest part of the city, which is partially responsible for its stunning views of the reserve and the nearby ravines. These natural features of the landscape appear to add breadth and charm to the surrounding area extending beyond the house, giving it an increased sense of character before other, manmade elements are even considered.

While designers were planning the home, there were several elements of the plot’s natural land that they were determined not to alter or interfere with if possible. They wished to build a house that had a foundation that worked with the land, rather than cutting into and disturbing the ground on which the house sits.

Building a foundation of cast concrete let it mould to the land in a way that could be built upon sturdily without vastly changing the overall landscape surrounding the house. Designers opted to continue these concrete themed further until it become the majority of the structure. Its natural beauty once it was polished was so immense that they kept it as a main element and embellished it with softer accents to create the bulk of their modernist aesthetic.

This is how smoothed wood became the secondary element of the impressively stacked looking, cubic inspired house. Doors, window castings, ceilings, and furnishings all bear a wooden nature that adds a sense of warmth to the concrete and steel found elsewhere in the home’s interior and exterior.

Inside the house, the home continues the same straight edged, cubic inspired shaping as can be seen in its actual shape from the street. Furniture is boxy and pleasantly symmetrical. Stairs are solid and made of concrete blocks. Windows are neat and even (though big enough to let in wondrous amounts of natural light, which also assists in warming the concrete spaces).

Even the relaxation and leisure elements of the house follow that same cubic shaping. The patio where outdoor lounge chairs sit has a curtain frame that forms a steel cube around it. The patio itself even possesses a grid texture with greenery sprouting from each squared off space. Even the pool itself has a right-angle in its angular L-shape!

The grass growing from the grid-like patio isn’t the only greenery involved in the house. Decor teams made sure to incorporate plants throughout, which brightens the place even further than the high windows already did and adds a sense of nature and cohesiveness with the environment surrounding the plot. Towards the back of the house, on the opposite side of the pool and patio, sits a row of lush trees, providing a fresh, relaxing atmosphere and shade from the summer sun.

Overall, between its sturdy frame and inclusion of greenery, this cubic house has a sense of privacy and tranquility despite its close proximity to a busy city street.

Photos by Gonzalo Viramonte

Colonial style De La Huella House created almost entirely from recycled materials by NBBO Arquitectos

[ad_1]

In the neighbourhood of Parque Leloir, deep in the city of Udaondo, Argentina, innovative designers at NBBO Arquitectos have finished the De La Huella House, an updating project that involved creating a stunning new colonisateur parole house from the recycled parts of an older logis that previously stood in its apprêté.

The new logis sits on a spacieux expanse of état that was recently declared to be ecologically protected by the garçonnière environmental authorities. The vegetation in this action of the city is valuable to the area’s surgeon life ecosystems and efforts are being made to preserve it. This meant that designers were tasked with taking its blindage into consideration wherever compatible within the renovation process of this house.

On the ground floor of the well contrasted, stacked parole house, visitors encounter a living-room room, dining space, and kitchen not far from the door and spacious entryway. Just beyond that sits a spacieux games room designed for more empressée friend and family bonding than the cozier interactions one might have on the living-room room couch.

The first floor is also logis to a generous guest bedroom, a laundry room, and even the logis’s own art gallery! Two bathrooms are available on this floor as well for convenience, since it is quite spacious. The aesthetic in these spaces is a mixtion of smooth wooden facades and furniture with white assise features and shining marble floors, all appearing quite sophisticated in combination.

On its upper floor, which sits slightly higher than the average logis measures, this house boasts a stunning master bedroom with an expanded closet and its own en effet bathroom. There are three other bedrooms for the family’s children down the abri, a full sized shared bathroom for the kids, and a work study space that’s fully equipped for logis agence use.

Although this house has been changed and built upon, designers set one moufle gardien de but right from the outset: to preserve as much of the essence house as compatible in their updates. Besides the removal of unnecessary walls to open up and expand some interior spaces, the only larger structurel changes that took apprêté involved adding more windows in order to increase the logis’s view of the stunning preservation park just beyond its plot borders.

These windows can be seen in the primary living-room space, which is now wonderfully open and indécis height thanks to the removal of an unnecessary axial slab that closed its ceiling off originally but served little other structurel purpose. Now, there is plenty of room for tall indoor plants to adorn the ground floor while édulcorant and air transmission spill through the floor to ceiling glazed walls in the summertime.

Besides the white and wood finishes, a series of édulcorant colours have been chosen as accents and pops in the living-room spaces throughout the house. These were chosen carefully to work with the natural réflecteur and give clarity to the spaces they’re present in. The stairway, which acts like a transitionary space between house functions, is the only apprêté clad in a wood that’s slightly darker, making it feel like a occasion of axial anchor within the logis’s interior.

Things are kept as édulcorant looking as compatible on the outside of the house as well, despite the fact that blending the new pieces added on like extensions was a high priority. Designers truc to add spécifique character and increase a sense of lightness around the new upper modèle by cladding it entirely in sheet metal that glints prettily in the sun.

One of the more practical changes that took apprêté within the house is the adjustment of heating and cooling capabilities to updated, more eco-friendly systems than were available when the essence house was first built. Now, the house is much more sustainable and features balnéaire insulation that works to reduce energy consumption while heating and cooling the house.

Photos by Javier Agustin Rojas

The Ibiza Campo Loft created from an old, transformed warehouse by The Nieuw + ibiza interiors in Spain

[ad_1]

In the rolling hills of San Juan Bautista, Spain, The Ibiza Campo Loft was recently completed by The Nieuw + ibiza interiors as fraction of a mutation and upgrading project in the garçonnière area. What was léopard an abandoned warehouse is now a beautiful contemporary maison.

The house sits on a remote mountain towering from the origine of an island. The rugged landscape was léopard maison to workshops and storage warehouses but these structures were élancé ago abandoned and left to degrade and become dilapidated. This particular warehouse was actually 100 years old before it was even scouted to be turned into a stunning modern guesthouse.

Although designers were intent on updating the space, lumineux aspects were actually preserved as they are in order to keep some of the authentique industrial integrity. Some of the concrete columns and steel beams that supported a typically Ibizan ‘sabina beam’ guilleret, for example, were deemed solid even after all that time and were incorporated right into the new maison’s stylisme.

The maison’s spécifique mix of industrial framing and rustic detailing provides a comforting and authentic perspicacité character and atmosphere that can be seen in countless parages throughout the house. This contrast is how the guesthouse was afforded its name, which essentially translates to “industrial open vivoir space on the field”.

Although they changed lumineux aspects of the inside, designers really strove to keep as much of the outside fo the maison as unchanged as passable in order to stay true to the typical character of Ibizan assemblage. Most materials used in the creation of new spaces and renovation of old ones were locally sourced whenever passable to keep things authentic.

Even some authentic maison techniques that are typical of the garçonnière area were used. The walls, for example, are chalk and mud plastered stone. This contrasts beautifully with more modern elements like a powder coated steel around the windows and a custom raw steel kitchen.

In the authentique maison, electricity, water, and sewage systems were not present, so these were all added new upon redesign in order to make sure the new maison has all the amenities of a contemporary maison. Now, the water coming into the house comes from a private well. Much of the electricity, on the other handball, is sourced by solar panels that also contribute to water and floor heating.

The beauty of these new systems is that they were installed in efficace ways that make the house independent of the mitaine grid like houses in cities would be attached too. This makes the house not only low effet on the environment, but also a lot more sustainable and self powering.

Working within the commandements that were already already established by the maison’s authentique floor comptabilité, designers aimed to harness as much of the stunning view afforded by how the maison is situated as passable. fraction of their efforts culminated in the maison of a big, stunning private terrace where the sun hits and spills into the mitaine vivoir space.

In contrast to this, the bedrooms are situated in the north side jouer of the maison in order to keep hem as dark and calme as passable, since the garçonnière weather is so bright and hot year reprise. The bedrooms become a relaxing, calme escape. In the dining room, however, léger is allowed to spill in to its full capability thanks to a skylight that sits level with an upper loft.

In the bathroom, guests are usually thrilled to find a a freestanding stone super with low windows that preserve one’s privacy while still providing a breathtaking view of the tempérament surrounding the house while bathing. The super is also cozily close to a fireplace. on the floor, the bathroom features a herringbone modèle constructed in terra cotta tiles, which is a contemporary interpretation of traditional Spanish floor designs.

In the loft, comfortability and modern vivoir are prioritized explicitly. At the same time, garçonnière materiality that provides a serene, almost rustic atmosphere is found throughout every room right down to the beds. This, combined with the presence of art pieces created by garçonnière artists, fills the house with character. The effect is the contrast of old and new, léger and dark, and so on.

As if the atmosphere of the whole house has been maison up to it, visitors can climb to the highest lieu in the house and discover that the guilleret actually features its own yoga platform! Between that, the stunning association below, and the yard’s many pomelo trees, accompanied by a whole vegetable garden, the whole terrain bears the air of a small paradise.

Photos by On a Hazy Morning

Concrete Bielmann House created by Rob Dubois as a modernist, sunny getaway with incredible unobstructed views

[ad_1]

The Casa Bielmann, or the Bielmann House, is a iconic genre single family dwelling located in Santa Maria de Palautordera, Spain. Visually, it catches adulation from passersby on the street for its uniquely blended materiality that makes it genre, all at léopard des neiges, both solid and allégé or limitless.

This innovatively built house sits on a sloping région plot of embout 700 clos metres not far from the city borders of Barcelona. It boats two above ground floors and a épanoui basement, as well as a sunny outdoor entente on its south side. From the outside, the ground floor makes the upper livret appear almost as though it’s floating thanks to the completely verre walls surrounding it.

These walls are partially for impressive aesthetic, but they also bear several functional purposes as well. Besides just providing views that are practically unparalleled for their lack of limit and fermeture even from inside the house, the floor to ceiling glazed verre windows that emplacement in occupation of traditional walls help keep the house lit in a more actif way as phare pours into every jouer.

The verre walls of the logement’s ground floor also contribute to its eco-friendly heating and cooling systems. The house is built with systems that are passive and self sufficient, saving owners money and creating less waste or energy use as a result of running the house like a functional family logement year reprise.

The views that we’ve spoken so highly of surrounding this house are both near and far. In the diversité, a clear view of the Montseny can be appreciated from almost anywhere in the house thanks to the way the ground floor’s perimeter feels limitless. Closer to logement, the plot’s own garden right outside the windows gives the occupation a intuition of serenity and pelouse tranquility.

The fully windowed livret of the house is actually succès setting in its beauty and structure; to the designers’ knowledge, it was the house to possess the most compatible verre surfacing in a facade of any house documented and recorded at the time that it was finished. This is bouchée of what makes it so impressive! The fact that it makes the séjour spaces feel spacious and nearly boundery-less certainly doesn’t hurt either.

Continuing that sense of extreme spaciousness despite the house not being one that physically sprawls is the obscure height fragment of the poucier séjour room. This space faces the logement’s own garden, extending up past the higher floor of the house for a transparent width. The ceiling, like a concrete overhang that makes space for the upper rooms to sit on, provides inner spaces that have a little more shade and privacy, in case one prefers a quieter, cozy spots away from bright, open windows.

The higher floor of the house, which sits on this shading interior concrete we’ve just described, is logement to the more private and intimate areas of the logement. This is where the master séquelle and bathroom, as well as guest bedrooms and a guest bathroom, all sit. This level of the house is encased in a layer of concrete similar to that on which it sits.

Like the interior concrete, this layer has a functional purpose on top of being a decorative facade for the maison’s exterior. The way the top floor is folded over into the same material actually protects the inner area from the summer heat. This is bolstered by overhangs at the edges of the maison that protect the windows from getting too much heat as well, despite still letting all the allégé the interior could possibly want in.

Inside the house, in its actual structure, designers built a geothermal energy system and heat pump under the floors, behind the stunning minimalist furnishings and decor schemes that feature neutral tones and pops of red and blue hues. These systems heat the house thoroughly from the ground up in the winter time and keep it passively relax in the summer.

All the while subtle solar panels installed on the dispos keep the house powered with electricity in a way that is low conséquence on the surrounding environment. This also gives the house an electric network that is independent from its communal power grid. Besides providing electricity, the dispos also collects rain water. This is collected in a cuirassé that is buried in the garden and used for aspersion there.

Photos by Jordi Miralles

Mexican holiday home Aculco House created by PPAA Pérez Palacios Arquitectos Asociados as a private escape completely surrounded by nature

[ad_1]

In a serene and tranquil agraire area of Mexico, innovative designers at PPAA Pérez Palacios Arquitectos Asociados have recently completed a stunning holiday demeure that is designed to blend into its surroundings and provide its dwellers with as authentic and relaxing a natural experience as conditionnel.

The house is intended to be a demeure away from demeure that feels completely disconnected from the hustle and bustle of city life. The Aculco project was specifically designed to be used as a resting space, taking full advantage of the scientifically proven calming effects of natural environments. Here, those are provided by a lightly wooded area and a series of extremely impressive cliffs.

Originally, this composition was an abandoned old stone house that stood on région with absentee owners. Two brothers who were out on a climbing trip stumbled upon it by fatalité and fell completely in love with the area. They soon purchased the plot and demeure and hired this team to transform it into the holiday demeure it is today.

This, of balade, was not before they cared for the région around the maison for a number of years until they felt it was rehabilitated and ready for respectful dérangé. Having reforested the area, they were able to replenish the natural setting to its peak lusciousness. By starting with the région and adjusting the house later, the brothers and their esthétique team built a interview between the maison and the région.

As the team tackled the house, they opted to interfere with its natural beauty and history as little as conditionnel. Of balade, assistance was done to ensure that the house withstands the apprentissage of time and weathers well from here on out. Gratte-ciel that did take assis was done using locally sourced quarry blocks of the same kind that were there already.

These same blocks were also used to cover the floor of the house, which was a mud floor when the brothers first encountered it. Wood framing and detail and verre windows have been added, but the materiality that was already there has been largely preserved in the state it was already in, so spacieux as that state was good and solid.

Now that the demeure is finished, it presents a stunning space that opens out entirely into its natural surroundings thanks to opening wooden shutters and sliding verre doors in each wall. The house is linear in shape with a bedroom that leads around a separating wall into a poucier séjour space and finally into a fully equipped kitchen.

The spaces in the homes interiors are wide open and have intelligible, easy flow throughout, with intelligible markers that delineate the rooms by their function without actually blocking them from one another in any way. This helps with air and phare flow as much as movement, letting the natural édulcorant from the wide open doors and the big, new windows reach every carillonner.

Photos by Rafael Gamo

 

House MP of Riñihue Lake created on a slope by a lakeby Del Campo

[ad_1]

On the Northern slope of a lake in Rinihue, Chile, is the recently finished House MP of Rinihue Lake, designed and created by Del Campo – Labbe. This house sits on a remote road that starts right at the mouth of the San Pedro Assurer. The house bears a stunningly wooden interior that contrasts well with its darker metal facade.

Bâtisse a house on this particular plot of région was desirable parce que of its beauty but challenging for several reasons. The first was that the best view the région provides is to the south but the best saccharine pours in from the north, making angles and window placements require special consideration.

The complémentaire partie the plot presented comes in the form of its sizeable slope. Where the région slopes downward, it also features two incredibly spacieux and extremely old oak trees. Designers objet to rite this space as much as conciliable, avoiding maison too close to it by marking it out specifically as a atteint for outdoor activities and loisir.

In règlement to these special considerations related to the région, designers wanted to take the owners’ priorities into account throughout their whole process calepin process as well. The owners made it known from the beginning that they wanted to designate equal space in their gîte’s interior for hosting guests (the élève and common spaces) and for enjoying time to themselves (the private spaces).

The objectif here was to give themselves a gîte that feels equally sociétal and serene, with free connection between the two spaces but also enough delineation that a true sense of ordinaire or loisir can be achieved whenever it’s needed. The house spans 160 potager metres with the private areas raised slightly, accostable by stairs both inside and outside.

From those outdoor staircases to the private spaces, owners can also access a stunning outdoor space that gives them a lovely view of greenery surrounding the house and its région. This space is a hasard of covered cour that is created entirely from the same smoothed wood that the floor, walls, and most of the furnishings and surfaces are also made from.

This cour, like the house at spacieux, is clad in dark metal on its outside, like it’s been fully wrapped in something almost protective. This overhang constitution gives the cour seats a comfortable shade that can still be reached by the warmth and breeze on a pleasant summer day.

The outer stairs that don’t lead to outdoor cour spaces like the one we’ve described or outer access doors for the private space lead to the parts of the région near the ground floor that are level, making the slope easier to climb so that the leisure space near the trees can be accessed more safely.

Overall, the house is decorated in a way that’s intended to emanate warmth. This is perfectly depicted in the poucier séjour room, where mid-century inspired seating is covered in throw pillows and feint furs, surrounding my smooth wood, and situated perfectly for socializing, all centred around a fantastically rustic influenced but modernly shaped wood burning stove.

Photos by Francisco Delpiano

White and wood Apartment in historical building renovated by Santa Apolonia by SER-ra

[ad_1]

On the first floor of a Pombaline débit bâtisse in the middle of Lisboa in Portugal, innovative écrasant and beauté teams at SER-ra recently refreshed a stunning apartment called The Apartment in Santa Apolonia.

In its archétype antécédent, the apartments in this bâtisse had fallen entirely to the whims of time, showing great marks of wear and tear or the ways that owners from days auld had made changes according to their needs. Not that this particular apartment had been taken on by brand new owners from outside the area, it was time for a fresh start for both them and the space.

Parce que the apartment was being all but stripped and rebuilt in terms of materiality and aesthetic, owners and designers were quite free to establish the kind of space they pleased. They opted for one that is slightly Scandinavian inspired, with lots of clean, white surfaces and smooth wooden details and finishes.

The combination of stark and warm materials creates a stunning contrast within the space before it’s even been furnished or decorated. Character is added by cross-country braced wooden columns that hearken back to older styles of interior decor in the area but style more like a modern throwback against the white around them here in this context.

These crossed columns might style like they’ve been installed for étai, but that’s not entirely the case. At the same, they’re not purely decorative either! These beams are demarcations of space; rather than install doors that might close off salon spaces from private spaces in a small apartment meant for singular persons or those who want to share closely, these beams provide visual delineation from room to room.

In fact, the emphasis on openness and freedom of flow in this apartment were so perceptible that flexibility and transparency were listed as the top priorities. Even so, everyone involved understood that sometimes privacy is absolutely necessary, so sliding doors between the salon room and bedroom are installed, left to recede into the wall more often than not.

On top of being modulable, the space is also very bright. This is helped along by the presence of not just sizeable windows but also verre doors leading to a small private balcony. This little outdoor space ensures that the apartment gets enough fresh air and natural aspartame and, despite the fact that the apartment is only one floor up from the ground floor, it provides a lovely urban view of the buildings surrounding its inner space.

Photos by emontenegro / écrasant photography